The wilderness year

The last extended www.unchainedworld.com ride, was the first www.unchainedworld.com ride. It took place in 2006 when I arrived in the USA and my work permit didn’t. I had time to ride across the USA, so I did. I set a few parameters to which I’d try and abide, such as no interstate and only unique venues for food and accommodation.

Why?

I’d spent more years than I care to recall, working on a project for a large fast food chain, trying to develop training content that would deliver a uniform product range, anywhere in the world, at any time.

Granted their product may be the best it could be, but it isn’t the best that there is, I was sure of that. But finding the best of the best, would mean wading through some of the worst of the goddam awful worst.

Not that that’s an issue. Good and bad create memories. Bland, forgetable uniformity, non-descript average, that’s what I really can’t tolerate.

So my mission was to avoid what I knew were average, the fast food chains and the franchises. Search and sample to good and the bad, with hopefully the good out numbering the bad.

The ensuing ride from Atlanta to Seattle took 45 days, covered 10,018 circuitous miles, 45 minutes of rain and provided me with some delicious memories, some scars (bed bugs bite hard and deep in Virginia) and a desire to take and do something with the trip. That’s how www.unchainedworld.com came into being.

I believe that some of the personal passion evaporates and is diluted as a business expands. The folk that are bought in, never have that same desire or need, or committment. So, Mom and Pop places, places where you deal directly with the owner face to face, that’s where you can find the gems. Granted, you’ll also find dross, however, without subjecting yourself to the dross, you won’t appreciate the gems. That’s what unchainedworld is about, looking for, finding and sharing the gems.

www.unchainedworld.com is an on-going project, but because it’s all free, it’s not a job. So, I still needed to find employment when my official papers came through.

I decided that something bike related was the best option. I’d seen that there was a recruitment drive for Rider Coaches, so applied. After all, I’d learned to ride in the UK with its strict programmes. I’d taken advanced police lead courses and passed. I’d also taken my rider exam here in the USA and frankly it was a joke. I passed, even though my bike broke down while I was waiting to ride through the test cones, an 1150 BMW GS was quickly replaced by a 500cc Buell that I’d never seen before. If that was the test, then surely I could teach to that standard.

What follows is the discussion that took place during my Instructor training.

Riding the Range…why?

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Too late

Lamble said:

There were three of us, me leading and a second who lead when I fell short of the mark, but behind us was the real authority. The guy who could have pulled those in danger from the course. It was his decision to over ride my lead opinion that the four who carried on into the second day should carry on. I’m content that I said they shouldn’t and the outcome validated my stance.

I’m going to stick with the admiration factor for those who do this. It’s not easy and it’s not fun. I can see it being rewarding through those you do get through the course. But I also stand by my conviction that the candidates put themselves in the instructors hands and the instructor should have some responsibility in esta

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

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It’s a ride report of sorts, as I was riding and this is, after all, a report.
For some reason, which isn’t becoming any clearer, I decided to undertake the WA DOT Rider Instructor Course, and this last weekend was the first stage.

Any of you who have taken the BRC Basic Rider Course, or even the ERC Experienced Rider Course, will hopefully have enjoyed a smooth, proficient, informative training course, lead by an able instructor or two.

If you’d joined us rookies in Shelton WA on a windswept airfield, you’d realise very soon, how the finished Instructor article, is far from the stumbling, disjointed, embarrassing ineptitude, we were displaying to our fine mentors.

We were 8, a BRC class can be 12. We can all ride (to a degree) some BRC candidates need to be shown how to mount a m/c.
There’s a book (several actually) that show the processes of instruction, they are the skeleton, you need to add the sinew, muscles, blood and flesh that bring it all to life…that isn’t scripted!

You get to ride your own bikes around the range and to see a gold wing in the much feared “box”, being flicked in a figure of 8, was an education in itself.

To have all those habits you’ve collected along the way, pointed out as being errors is an even bigger and harsher education. In my helmet, the number of ” But, but, but’s” was building by the moment.

Guys and gals, let me tell you, not in search of some sort of praise but in recognition of those who have undertaken this route before and whom I hope to join, it’s bloody harder than it looks to instruct.
There’s far more to it than lining up 12 bikes, covering the saddle with student buttocks and pointing them at cones.

Is it worth it?
Looking at my homework and the daunting 2nd weekend coming up, as I sit here today, do you know, I’m not sure.
Will I carry on torturing myself? yep.
I’ll be there next weekend, ready to have my pre-conceptions challenged, my riding skills (or lack of) critiqued visciously and for the wind and rain to have me
questioning my sanity.

Do I know why?
No.
Answers on a post card please, especially from any of you who are masochistic and enjoy instructing.

Novices need instruction. There aren’t enough instructors. Motorcycling gets a bad reputation when untrained riders harm themselves. Could you help

 

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/07/2007 at 20:46

 

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Riding the Range…why?

Good luck finishing up.   Yes the course seems tough and you can feel especially inept at times.   Our student teaching Saturday was called ” The FLaming Spiral into Hell” by our trainer.   It was truly awful, looking back.  

After it’s over, though, hopefully you have a basic understanding of what to do and where to be and such and can begin the fun part.   Developing a method of your own.  I have been on the range for 6 years now and have been the lead at our site for 3 years.   For your first full season, I would recommend doing 12 -18 classes to really begin to understand the course and materials.   After that you could slack off a bit.  Here in NC we have to do 3 per year to stay certified and folks who only do the minimum have trouble being comfortable with the class and coaching.  

 Good luck and stay with it.   Develop those habits for yourself that you are supposed to be teaching, so  that they become second nature in class and out.  
PM me if you have any questions or anything.  be glad to help if I can.

Randy

Posted on 05/10/2007 at 09:09

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

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Satan’s own cones

2nd weekend down nr Olympia doing this instructor riding course.

I’ll think of you all on your twisties, as I ride in and out of cones…
bastids, little orange swines that define limits and success. Evil orange/green dictators. I hate them, I really, really hate them, so very, very, very, very muchly much. Contemptuously indignant rubber devils, they are there now, just waiting, daring me to hit one, so they can uniformly shout “Gotcha!”
They watch and wait and then, with even the faintest of clips, they spring up, fly through the air in a display of outrageous flambouyance, so it’s obvious you are at fault.
It’s a sham, I tells ya, a sham…they aren’t hurt. Oh yes, they might pretend to be and protest their case to the officials (bleating little squealers), but, but, but…. they aren’t! They are indistructable and although they are brightly coloured on the outside, they have dark souls and evil intent.
 
 
Should be fun.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/11/2007 at 11:38

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: Riding the Range…why?

Rcarlisle said:

Good luck finishing up.   Yes the course seems tough and you can feel especially inept at times.   Our student teaching Saturday was called ” The FLaming Spiral into Hell” by our trainer.   It was truly awful, looking back.  

After it’s over, though, hopefully you have a basic understanding of what to do and where to be and such and can begin the fun part.   Developing a method of your own.  I have been on the range for 6 years now and have been the lead at our site for 3 years.   For your first full season, I would recommend doing 12 -18 classes to really begin to understand the course and materials.   After that you could slack off a bit.  Here in NC we have to do 3 per year to stay certified and folks who only do the minimum have trouble being comfortable with the class and coaching.  

 Good luck and stay with it.   Develop those habits for yourself that you are supposed to be teaching, so  that they become second nature in class and out.  
PM me if you have any questions or anything.  be glad to help if I can.

Randy

 

 

If I get through this (devil cones permitting) I’ll get back to you for tips on anxiety counselling.

I need to go to my “happy place” now, for quite a while.

 

 

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/11/2007 at 11:41

 

Thisguy

Joined: Jan 19, 2007

 

private message

Re: Satan’s own cones

Lamble said:
They are indistructable and although they are brightly coloured on the outside, they have dark souls and evil intent.

Should be fun.

 

This is brilliant. I hope you did/do have fun.

Steven ? has considered becoming an instructor and helping
                 to spread the gospel of moto, but is just too much
                 of a selfish bastid to give up his canyon time

 

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Posted on 05/11/2007 at 13:27

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

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week 2

Okay here’s the larger picture.
First week all my clothes were stolen from the room I’d booked, while I was on the range. Instead of doing the assigned homework, I’m watching security video to spot a touratech bag (plus for some reason two mugs and a perculator!). Then the police arrive. They think the perp may be asleep (drug induced) in a “conspicuous” truck, just down the road from my hotel.
1:30 am Police come back with my bag (no sign of mugs and perculator though), only problem, not all my clothes are there and those that are, are covered in either red paint or, paint thinner fluid.
The perp had been incarcerated, as he’d also got a gun with all the serial numbers filed off.
I passed the truck next day on the way to the range-it was conspicuous in the highest sense-white with paint splashes of all colours, in a giant abstract that I believe may have been inspired by Mondrianesque geometric abstractness and the freer flowing forms of colour and shape adopted by Pollock, alternatively it may have been to hide rust spots and been alcohol inspired.

Start day two, asleep. By mid-day I’m being asked if things are “okay?”
I couldn’t stay alert.
That’s when the cones started to move about in a swirling pattern. I realised I’d had the recovered bag and contents next to me, for the little time I did get some sleep and had been inhailing paint and thinner fumes for two hours-I was half asleep and half floating on a chemically induced high…not ideal for a training programme.

I was given free accommodation and a free VIP meal for two by the hotel, who did their utmost to help.

Jump to week 2. Everything’s going okay. Mrs Lamble has come down to use the facilities and REO Speedwagon are performing at the hotel, so lot’s of mullets and cowboy hats on 50-somethings, are everywhere.

The course had gone well, despite me starting the activities with the use of a rubber chicken-I can’t explain that.

At dinner, a rather splendid buffet affair, she who must be obeyed and I, are replenishing our plates with blackberry cobbler and icecream. We return to our table to find it’s been cleared and other diners sitting there. Our wine-gone, our seats and table gone.
Free VIP meal number two.

REO must have been good, because despite my turning in early, the crowd from the concert turned up at 1:30 am, singing a medley of their hit (I only know one of their songs and I didn’t know they’d sung it, neither did Mrs Lamble, much to her embarrassment, when she met Mr REO, Mr Speed and Mr Wagon in the elevator/lift the next day).

So on the range, same sagging red sleep deficient eyes as the previous week, same lack lustre performance, same dramatic afternoon drop off. I’m sure the mentor thought I’d been partying, heavily, or been to an REO Speedwagon concert.
Some how I managed to drag the bike round the cones without hitting them (although they deserved to be well and truly spanked, but I know that’s just their siren like ways, lure you in too near with their happy colours and enticing rubberiness, then crash you on the rocks of humiliation, cunning and devious swine).

So, took the written test, multiple guess format. Does anyone ever fail this?

Next, it’s live human beings, in real class and range situations and we novice instructors need to be slick.

I’ll try and get some sleep ahead of time, because you can be sure as “cones is cones” (sic), something will come along to ruin my night time visits to “teddy goes bye byes in slumber-land” and I’ll be looking at a class of over excited, expectant novice riders, through eyes that look like tobasco drips in a muddy puddle.

Is this a ride report?
An adventure is where ever you find it!

 

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/16/2007 at 23:39

 

Thisguy

Joined: Jan 19, 2007

 

private message

Re: week 2

Ha-ha, I’m glad I found this thread again. What an adventure!

I wonder how the perp got into your room to steal your stuff? Oh well, do keep us posted on your teaching experiences.

Steven

 

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Posted on 05/15/2007 at 06:44

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: week 2

Thisguy said:

Ha-ha, I’m glad I found this thread again. What an adventure!

I wonder how the perp got into your room to steal your stuff? Oh well, do keep us posted on your teaching experiences.

Steven

 

 

Good question and one I spent time pondering myself.

 There are two possibilities, the second of which is a horrible thought.

1.The cleaner was tidying my room and the opportunity arose to nip in, steal and dash out.

 2. The perp looks like Mrs Lamble and was mistakenly given the key I’d left with reception, for when she arrived. So here’s my dilemna, either I could fancy the perp, or Mrs L isn’t the beauty I think she is?

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/15/2007 at 22:13

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Man of mystery

I’ve booked myself in as….. a shadow.

I know, it sounds good doesn’t it? All sort of enigmatic, with an air of danger, Bond style, cutting a dashing figure on the fringe of your vision. They seek him here, they seek him there…

Debonnair, gallant, intreguing, a man’s man with undefinable panache, suave and sophisticated. The sort of guy who has room presence and turns heads, rather than stomachs.

Well it’s not! Not any of the above at all, not even in the slightest.

 What it is, is, chief lurker. You know, the bloke that hangs around at the back of a group. If it were a party I’d be “Nobby-no-mates” in the slightly discoloured trousers that have a flair and generate enough static when I walk to light a torch, or scorch a toddler. The uncle, who sneaks out a silent sprouty whiffer at the Christmas family gathering, “Are you having that now Albert, or should we rap it for you?”
That’s it, I’ll be the pointless one, shadowing the instructors and only fit to move the planks in the ride over obstacle exercise.

Still it should give me some insight into how to interact with the clientelle.
And much to my delight, the scheduler said, “So, you’ll be kicking cones then”.

Almost makes the 6am starts this weekend worth it. I wonder if I still have a pair of winkle-picker toed shoes (punk era leftovers) somewhere, they could do serious damage?

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/16/2007 at 23:57

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Ta Daaaaa!

At last nights BRC class, where I was all shadowy, being concealled behind the mass of notes I was taking, I was asked, in a ‘told sort of way’, that, “You’ll be riding the demos then, this weekend?”

 So, no more the chorus line for me. It’s the spotlight, centre stage, a chance for fame and misfortune, for surely I’ll cock things up somewhere along the way.

Fortunately I don’t work on a Friday (I tried full time employment and it disagreed with me), the sun is shining, so I can go and get some practise in, ahead of my public debut.

Do I need to polish my boots?

 Make-up, make-up…it’s time for my close up!

 

 

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/18/2007 at 12:53

 

Thisguy

Joined: Jan 19, 2007

 

private message

Re: Ta Daaaaa!

Don’t worry. No matter what you do, the students will think it’s correct.

And you’ll be riding a 250 or 125, so it should be easy.

Keep us posted.

Steven

 

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Posted on 05/18/2007 at 14:35

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: Ta Daaaaa!

Thisguy said:

Don’t worry. No matter what you do, the students will think it’s correct.

Steven

 

 

Isn’t that the problem?

We could end up with a dozen novices all throwing tantrums and cursing at cones in anglo saxon!

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/18/2007 at 16:55

 

Redstreak2

Joined: Jan 02, 2007

Location: Austin, TX

 

private message

Re: Ta Daaaaa!

OK Love, more please.

Your writing is most certainly entertaining as well as … entertaining… oh, but I digress…

Please, do continue the story.  Pictures are unimportant since the tale you weave is so very colorful that reality should NOT get in the way!!

Onward…… please…..

.

.

 

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Happiness isn’t around the corner, it’s IN the corners.

 

Posted on 05/19/2007 at 15:07

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

ACT 1-enter stage left, exit asap.

“Despite what you saw in the demo, I want you to stay on the American side of the cones”

 It was a harsh, if correct revue of my first ever demo ride. Sure, I’d started on the right hand side and undertaken the humiliation of “power walking” across the range (it looks like a herniated duck doing a hundred yard dash, only in a helmet, gloves and boots). Sure I’d done the 270 degree turn. But, and I swear this is true, as I turned my back on my orange cone, it shuffled in a few feet so I came out on the wrong side for riding back across. Mind you, it did cause the novice group to re evaluate, “find a safe place to stand”.

 The Boeing parking lot is a drab place, although parking lots aren’t usually renouned for their aesthetics are they, so you could say it’s a typical parking lot, only humungously large, so drabber by incrementation.

The sky was equally drab and leaden and to be frank, so were the students. A less responsive bunch you’d be hard pushed to meet, unless you happened to teach the Helen Keller class. (That’s a little in poor taste-sorry, but you get the idea, it was like trying to suck blood from a mummy).

I won’t go into their particular performances, suffice to say, tomorrow needs to be a lot better.

My performance level nearly peaked at adequate and I was asked to ride all but one of the day’s demos. No one laughed and no one died. In my books I’d call that a success, of sorts.

I’ve been asked back for an encore tomorrow, which could be due to the fact I’m doing this for nothing, the Instructor is a sadist, the students have asked for me because I set achievable goals, or, any combination of those, if not all.

I need sleep now and the use of a clean toilet-not necessarily in that order though.

More tomorrow.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/19/2007 at 21:28

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: ACT 2-

One thing I admire about the USA is the can do mentality, but with it should be a balance, a yin to the yang, the can’t do acceptance.

Some people shouldn’t be allowed anywhere near a motorcycle and by the end of day one, this politically correct claptrap that doesn’t allow any criticism means three people were carried over.The need to find something to praise in every situation, however potentially catastrophic, meant that today has been truly horrid.

If someone doesn’t know their clutch from their front brake, then praising them for using a head turn isn’t really doing them a favour. Praise after relentless praise only leads them to believe they are competant and making progress, so, the harsh reality that they are a danger to not only themselves but others and they can’t carry on, becomes an even harder pill for them to swallow.

Three guys, who should have been cut yesterday, were counselled out today, one after having tried to mount another bike in the staging area while riding his own bike (like a weird mating scene from the nature channel) and further sexualised by the fact that he dispensed with the lower half of his trouser leg on the exhaust. The second, after performing so appallingly that his comment that he didn’t need the training, as he’d got a license, sent a cold shiver through my bones (that being despite the fact I’d had my Gerbing jacket set at thermo nuclear). The third guy faired better once his two buddies had departed, but there was still only a snowballs chance in hell, that he’d get through the evaluation. He didn’t, dramatically.

Neither did several other novices, some equally as inept, but more down to test nerves than an overall inability. No, actually, if I’m honest, they were poor too and I’d not want to share a road with them, they were too erratic.

Still the praise went on, even while explaining that they’d failed.

When would reality kick in?

When would, for the sake of motorcycling, these folk be  made aware that not everyone has a right to be a winner, a rider?

I’m unsure as to my ability to perpetuate the myth that, just because you want something, you automatically deserve it. That it’s everyone’s right to be a success. For folk to be outstanding, they must stand out. Stand out from who? From those who don’t stand out, that’s who.

I know this is not the usual jolly jape style of earlier posts, but I’m questioning my ability to spout platitudes all day and whether I should pack in now and cut my loses.

Was I any better when I was learning? Probably not, but that’s not my issue here. If I was crap, I’m sure I was told I was and what needed to be done about it, not molly coddled with fatuous loveliness and praised for an inconsequential action. Motorcycling is a serious business, that can be fun, but is always potentially dangerous. Fluffy bunnying folk, is, in my opinion, misplaced in such a situation.

Plus it was raining.

I rode the demos and only messed up on two things. I jumped lane change and went straight to a swerve and in the box my counterweighting wasn’t visible enough. I can live with those, it’s my perception of whats right being challenged that I’ll find difficult to adjust if I am to carry on.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/20/2007 at 23:22

Riding the Range…why?

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

I woke up with a hangover this morning. Not alcohol induced, or chemically enabled, but a moral hangover. Here’s what has been nagging throughout my dreams.

Could I cope with someone passing the evaluation because I’d only said “nice”things to them, when it’s obvious they will be unsafe away from a secure , hazard free parking lot and mixing it up with other vehicles, travelling faster than the 20mph they’ve experienced?
It’s a question I need to address, if I am to carry on.
How do you instructors out there, reconcile this?
I know that you give them your best and that the BRC is better than self-taught. But, do you draw,  a moral line and if so, where?
Is it like the risk ladder, we all create our own point?

Is the justification really as simple as, “well there’s nothing else”?

Does being pleasant and polite, mean you can’t be honest, and that you will only get results if you perpetuate the “feel good about yourself” philosophy.

I’m not asking for permission here to look a student in the eye and say, “Get off the bike now, you are  f&^*(&^%$£” useless”. But, “motorcyclists need to be able to control a bike in a number of situations, some of which can be potentially dangerous if they get it wrong. So far, you are getting it wrong and I need you to change that straight away”. You could go on to explain how, but I’d guess you’d already have done the ‘how’ part, in the pre ride spiel and the demo.

I’m concerned for them, for the image of motorcycling and for my conscience.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/21/2007 at 10:36

 

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

back to reality

Back in my day time job, cubicle bound and shuffling pixels, I can see the attraction of a weekend spent, standing in a drizzly, cold grey, parking lot, Even waddling like march of the penguins across the range, seems preferrable to stupifyingly dull flowcharts.

There’s just so much variety with the students. Sure the course follows a strict format and no I still don’t feel comfortable with each element, or stitching them together (more of a frankenstein than a versace), however ,I can see the rewards, whilst financially insignificant in comparison, could provide that snuggly-warm, well-done-me feeling that I’ll never get from a gant chart.

Now if I can just come to terms with those cones.

I hate clowns too, by the way.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/23/2007 at 00:20

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

sleep softly, sweet prince

I hope no one can trace this back to source, because I’d get into trouble (that’s not a challenge!).
I was shady (yes, the real stout shady, not you fake slim shadys-see, I’m hip and down with the kidz in da hood!) again for a classroom session, for novices. This was their first encounter with the programme.

I nearly decided to give up riding on the spot.

It must have been the most lack lustre presentation I’ve ever been to. I’ve been to cremations where there was more life in the air (prevailing winds playing havoc with the dust – remind me to tell you at some time, how my father came to be snorted by Tel Aviv customs).

It wasn’t the students. They were just begging for something to liven up the droning and without an outside window they were even deprived of the more stimulating diversion of seeing the grass growing. 

 

It may as well have been a latin lesson from Mr Bishop (you probably don’t know him, but the scars are deep), or a lecture on Latex Moulding and the Cone Industry circa1850 to the present day, Part IV. subtitled Cones during the Depression, it was pure purgatory. No injection of enthusiasm, no sense of involvement. Granted, technically, all the boxes were ticked, it’s just that the pen used to tick them was using diluted grey ink.
The statement, “so this weekend should be challenging but fun” was delivered with all the impact of a coma victim giving a speach, from inside an oxygen tent with a slow leak. (substitute any President or Prime Minister of your choice). Boooorrrrrrriiiinnnngggggg!
I wept inwardly at the missed opportunity to engage these souls (crying outwardly is so 1990’s and was just a way to show you were sufficiently sensitive to be worthy of getting inside a girl’s knickers).

On-the-other-hand, it gave me renewed committment, if only on the basis that, I couldn’t do any worse, even, if for some bizarre reason, I decided the medium of mime was the choice for the evening.

If you do find out who delivered this class, please don’t wake him.

 

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/25/2007 at 14:44

 

Thisguy

Joined: Jan 19, 2007

 

private message

Re: sleep softly, sweet prince

Steve, this is briliant. Holly smokes, if you can make the BRC half as engaging as your Xplor musings, your students are all going to excell.

On a more serious note, regarding your moral hesitations, just don’t let yourself pass onyone because you want to be a nice guy. As for the poeple who do pass the course, you can give them your best guidance and train them in fundamental skills. It’s up to them to embrace and apply those skills out on the street.

I’m going to be very interested to read about your experience when you finally come out of shadow mode.

Steven

 

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Posted on 05/25/2007 at 12:39

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Forest Fire

Well bless your cotton socks for saying so, however all is not favourable.

Holly Smokes? I assume the latter is some sort of pagan ritual performed while dancing naked around a Christmas tree, covered in tinsel (the tree that is) and with the wafting Holly Smoke permeating the air whilst juggling a turkey. Just be careful that a spark doesn’t set your bush on fire (can I say that without the double entendre-nope).Should make for an interesting office party though.

 

Or, it could be a typo, which is far less evocative of anything.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/25/2007 at 14:36

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

details details details.

Cones again I’m afraid. Does anyone have a definitive list of where the little buggers are supposed to go for each exercise?

I’ve seen a variety of greens here, oranges there. I’m sure if there were additional colours some people would happily bedeck the range with a rainbow of the interminable little rubber bleeders.

Also, if any of you out there have added key notes to your range cards, can I crib from you please…pretty please?

It’ll be exam time soon and I need to get these last few range details nailed down for once and for all. Oh yes, and transitions, transitions would be helpful too. In fact, if you could just pop along and do the demos and leading for me, that would be very nice. I think I’ve got the classroom sussed. But, while you are here, you may as well take a look at that too.

 

Come to think of it, any chance you could replace a bit of guttering, varnish the decking, a bit of weeding wouldn’t go amiss, perhaps the odd dab of paint here and there and if you are good with electrics….alternatively you could just tell Mrs L that I have an exam coming up, and that, takes priority.

 

Thanks.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 05/29/2007 at 21:17

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

today’s the day

!/2 day rehersing on the range, then this evening, willing victims face the unconvincing class of 07.

Tomorrow, if any decide to return, we get to have them again, but this time without the safety net of a desk and books, but with the ‘crocodile pit’ of motorcycles.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/01/2007 at 11:05

 

Thisguy

Joined: Jan 19, 2007

 

private message

Re: today’s the day

I’ll be checking this thread tomorrow evening to see how your day went.

-Steven

 

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Posted on 06/01/2007 at 18:18

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Results are in….

Washington State today announced that 6 new instructors will be joining their motorcycle training programme.

 

Was I one of them?

 

Let’s take a trip back in time for a moment. 

 

Image, if you will, twenty three eager novices sitting in a classroom which is part of a motorcycle emporium. A building festooned with the latest and greatest examples of chrome and fibreglass encrusted engineering. The desire these students have to touch every bike in the huge sales area is palpable. All that stands between them and dispensing with large wads of cash is, tentative wannabe instructors with little idea of how to facilitate this spending spree.

 

The lessons start in a less than promising manner. The only bonus being that hopefully our omnipresent examiner has joined the students in an early evening nap. (He reads this you know-how sneeky is that-Hello Brad!)

It’s a less than dynamic opening, in part due to the structure of the course, less shock and awe, more quote and bore. It’s hard to judge where the formalities should come, however some sort of up tempo begining would help set the standard.

 

Unfortunately, the guy who had to handle this was followed by someone that, in my opinion, should only follow someone who is about to exit the room.

Stupifyingly dull. If dollars hadn’t changed hands ahead of this point, people would surely have walked out

bought the bike that was nearest the door aand just ridden off (It wouldn’t have matter what that bike was, or the cost, but obviously there’d have been a premium on the fastest, as they’d get you the hell outa there quicker).

Guess who’s drawn the lucky straw to follow Mr Sandman?

Muggins me, that’s who.

 

I’m plotting a way to get to the front of class which will cause me to collide with as many chairs as possible, in the vain hope that by knocking students, I could perform a jesus and lazarus, raising from the dead thing.

 

Sometimes it’s a distinct bonus being a Brit. I was just different enough to have an edge. I saw eye lids begin to flutter and even some of the slumber-drool was slurped up. One or two even dained to rejoin this world and take part, answering the questions others had raised and for which I had no answer. They took pity on me. A stranger in a strange land, stranded in a strange situation and looking strangely, rather strange. I’m sure I could have secured donations for food parcels such was their charitable nature to this British fish, cast ashore, out of his element and without the comfy-blankie of chips.

 

I’m trying to recall the topic I covered, but this is Sunday and Friday is now just a dirty thumb print on my crib sheets of life, but it could have been wearing protective clothing and checking your bike before you ride, like we all do every time….don’t we!

My 20 minute slot done with, the rest of the evening careened from good to bad, via average and poor but mainly sat next to forgettable. 

So, having set the knowledge level for the students first day so low, I can’t say I was expecting much. But apart from the guy who couldn’t start because his boots weren’t suitable (brown tan, with grey socks and blue trousers-well i wouldn’t let anyone ride in such a fashion faux pas combination of colors would you?) these brave novices put on a display that positively spat in the eye of our best efforts to thwart their progress. They did well. Very well in fact.

We novice instructors however, continued to throw a whole tool shed’s worth of spanners in their works. We’d send them in the wrong direction, stop them for a chat, that would extend into a debate via a lecture. Every concieivable obstacle we gave them, they surmounted. Bless ’em, they didn’t deserve us and we certainly didn’t deserve them.

Saturday morning range passed. Everyone was sunburnt and dehydrated, lethargic and tired. 

Guess what?

It’s classroom time again. A last chance to drain the vestigaes of life from the student’s already battered and bruised bodies. And, I might add, there were no better suckers of life from souls that the group of novice instructors that now faced them. Another incoming barrage of dullness and ineptitude carefully camouflaged as teaching.

“Come to the light, come to the light”, I think we lost  a few that session. Mr Sandman read at them, other relied, somewhat unfortunately and misguidedly on their humour and I fell foul of not giving a toss anymore.

I admit it. At that moment in time, I couldn’t have cared less about the students, the tests, the idea of riding or, anything. I was too bored and it showed. I can usually muster up a stage face, pull out a little razzle dazzle and end with a ta daaaa, but not this time. I checked I’d hit the facts that needed covering and got out of there asap.

Why had this turned into a chore? Where had the dynamism of performing gone? Who knows, but this was one off those times I rusted instead of shining and I didn’t really care.

 

A long hard look at the day, revealled nothing obvious as a trigger, and even over the evening beer, I can’t say I came to any conclusions as to my attitude.

On the assumption that this was something I just had to work through, I and my fellow novices are on the range again Sunday morning.

I believed they were owed the best we could give (they deserved far better than this in actuality but we were limited in our ability to offer more) and some of us gave it. Others…nah not really.

 

I’d actually volunteered to take another exercise, in addition to EXERCISE #17 which is little more than , “there’s the range, go practise what you’ve learned”, so, I’m on #12 too.

 

Fan-bloody-tastic…nailed it…and looked sexy at the same time. The stoodes looked good doing the exercise, we looked good coaching. Perhaps this, was the light on the road to Damascus moment that I’d been looking for and hoping would arrive?

 

Exercise 17 came. Got that one spot on too.

I’d delivered my part of the bargain to the students, all they had to do was turn it on, one more time, for the test.

 

All but two did and those two were only a whisker’s width away.

They’d overcome our feeble classroom sessions, our dithering range management, blistering heat and learning how to ride bikes…it don’t get no better than that, do it?

Well yes it do do.

 

Washington State announced that there were 6 new motorcycle instructors as of Sunday. 

 

 

 

 

 

There were only six of us.

 

BUT…this isn’t the end. I’ve made a decision about whether I’ll carry on or not.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/04/2007 at 01:15

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: Results are in….

I almost forgot.

Accident report:

Location: The range

Time: 30 minute break

Casualty: My pride

Description: Big GS, small box. Counterweighting. I had been told when demoing at a previous session that my counterwieghting wasn’t visible enough, despite getting the bikes round successfully every time, so I decided to have a quick practise, where I would throw the bike out wider, to make it more obvious.

I threw but didn’t hold on. Low speed double flik flak with pike, degree of difficulty 0.0000001.

Marks: one mark on the tank, one on the crash bars and one on the now missing indicator lens.

Yah boo sucks.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/04/2007 at 00:58

 

Thisguy

Joined: Jan 19, 2007

 

private message

Re: Results are in….

Ha ha ha, good man. Perhaps you won’t have to resort to wearing a red nose, but you might want to bring one for Mr Sandman.

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Posted on 06/04/2007 at 13:02

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Decision

I’ve not so much procrastinated, more re evaluated. My circumstances have changed dramatically since setting out on this Instructor mission. Having qualified sort of ticks the box, I’ve done it. Do I therefore need to be getting up at weekends to be the figure of potential derision from more experienced instructors…and the students too.

Do I now have to give of my valuable free time (previously I worked 3 days per week and had the Fri-Mon off, now I’m a five day a week man plus potential weekends)?

I know that when the weather is niice on the range, I’d rather be riding. I know when the weather is bad on the range, I’d rather be somewhere else too.

While the other novices that passed were being bought lunch by their proud sponsor, mine was…wel who knows, but I didn’t hear from him until I chased him up. I don’t need the praise, but I will be a money earner for him, so a well done wouldn’t have gone amiss.

So, with so many negatives, my decision has been relatively easy to come to…

 

I’m going to do it.

Why?

The students. They are putting all their riding hopes into two days of me.

I may jack it in along the way. I certainly wont be doing the amount of classes I first envisaged. But this week, when I was training at the bike emporium, I recognised two folk. They were buying a 900 Vulcan. I’d helped teach them the week before. Granted only one of them had passed, but they were only buying one bike, so I don’t feel too worried by that.

They were excited, quite rightly so, about their future as part of our elite community of riders.

It just felt too special, to forgo feeling that way again in the future.

I only hope I’m good enough to get more through. As they were only trained to ride at 20mph in a lot, I’m only trained to deliver a couple of modules and ride a few demos. There’s a long road ahead for us all.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/05/2007 at 18:22

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Decision

I love it!!!  Your tale is spun much like a Douglas Adams novel.   Awesome! 

 As for coaching, it took me a while to get to the point you are morally already.   I was so excited to be coaching, that I missed the moral dilemma.  When it hit, I spoke to one of our trainers here in NC.   He told me that I shouldn’t be too hard on myself.   I am providing a service.   We are exposing the students to “correct” basic techniques.   What they decide and do with that information is something we, as coaches, can’t control. 

It’s been about 6 years exactly since I started this gig.   I was the in the last RSS class, the old, less politically correct, version.   It seems to have been harder to complete.   At least many publications will tell you that, if you so desire to find them.   It is tough to get used to being shiny and nice all the time, when you truly want to tell some folks that they have no business monkeying about on a motorcycle. 

 Our student teaching Satruday was called “the Flaming Spiral into Hell” by our trainer.  10 new coaches, 12 new students, a certain recipe for disaster, eh?   It was rough.  But we overcame that and managed to add 10 new coaches and 11 new riders to the card-carrying MSF grad class. 

As for demos and such, it gets easier with time and familiarity.  Our trainer said, and I agree, that it will take 6 -12 classes to feel familiar with the material and another 6 – 12 to become proficient.  After that, you will begin to “feel” the class and be able to lead them with a shining exapmple of basic motorcycle mastery.  And a good classroom repoire means a lot.   The new BRC lets you interject and keep it moving, rather than droning on lecture form. 

Good luck developing your style and stay with it.   You are helping folks.  You just haven’t been at it long enough to start seeing them out in public, where they gush over with the giddiness that a motorcycle can bring.  

 Sorry about the tipover on the GS.   I dropped my Vstrom demoing Ex 13 several years ago on a cold (34 degree) January morning on cold pavement and cold tires.   And as I recall, that is [so far] the only crash I have seen in that exercise.   Knock on wood.   There are only a few exercises where I haven’t seen some kind of crash. 

Sorry to ramble, but I was trying to cover everything in one post.   I truly enjoyed reading your tale and hope you stick it out.   It is very rewarding, but very trying at times.   I’ll be out there for the next two weekends in a row myself.  Sincve we’re on the east coast, I’ll try to get a good start to the day and send some good mojo westward.

Randy

Posted on 06/06/2007 at 08:19

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: Decision

In addition to the moral dilemna,. which I’ve more or less resolved in my head, if not in my actions, there’s a less worthy issue too.

I’ve come over to the USA and there’s a whole lot of it to see. I also struggle with routine, especially in the face of such immense variety. So, how will I feel facing regular weekends, performing the same exercises, when I’ve been doing that all week.

Initially, I was planning to instruct almost full time, but now I’m thinking once a month. That should enable me to repair the bike between lessons, take cone aversion therapy and still feel as though I’m giving something back to motorcycling in return for all the pleasure it’s given me.

An aside: My Bestman in England goes to the TT every year, but this time being the 100th TT he missed the booking deadline, so couldn’t get his bike on the ferry. He’s still there now though, pedalling his pushbike round the course. Less Mad Sunday, more saddle sore Sunday. There’s dedication.

Back to the instructing.

Classroom is my domain, I’m comfortable infront of large groups, especially when they are sitting and not in danger of falling over…falling asleep, now that’s a different matter.

On the range, I’ve less control and they know it. They can sniff fear, they can pick up on hesitation, they sense nervousness…and that’s just the cones, the students are even worse, they are motorised.

Good to hear your take on things though and the time scale. I sort of expect instant slickness, but perhaps that will have to wait. I’ve a couple of mentored sessions due, which should help, so long as I don’t get some oaf that wants to show how much I have to learn, by showing how good they are, but at my expense. There are two ways to be great, first to be great, the second to make everyone else look worse than you. If I get the second, the range might just be one cone short and the instructor/mentor might have to walk home with a mince.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/06/2007 at 22:28

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Decision

Lamble said:

Initially, I was planning to instruct almost full time, but now I’m thinking once a month. That should enable me to repair the bike between lessons, take cone aversion therapy and still feel as though I’m giving something back to motorcycling in return for all the pleasure it’s given me.

On the range, I’ve less control and they know it. They can sniff fear, they can pick up on hesitation, they sense nervousness…and that’s just the cones, the students are even worse, they are motorised.

Good to hear your take on things though and the time scale. I sort of expect instant slickness, but perhaps that will have to wait. I’ve a couple of mentored sessions due, which should help, so long as I don’t get some oaf that wants to show how much I have to learn, by showing how good they are, but at my expense. There are two ways to be great, first to be great, the second to make everyone else look worse than you. If I get the second, the range might just be one cone short and the instructor/mentor might have to walk home with a mince.

 

Once or twice a month is about all I can stand to coach.  Otherwise I get testy.   And I lose the empathy or compassion or whatever you want to call it.    

Practice those demos so the cones will be used to your being around them.  Let thecones smell you.   Again, you have to teach them (cones, of course) who’s boss and if you have to, run over one or two to let the rest see that you mean business.   They (cones) always bounce back, it seems.   

On the range, they (students) have fear too.   Just make sure you NEVER turn your back on a running bike, and if they begin to crash, let them.  No sense in being PART of it.   Don;t let them know you are a new coach.   Before long, you won’t be.  

 And one more tip. Never talk to them too long at a coaching stop.  We’re told in NC to keep it to 7 words or less.   Pick one thing for them to remember to work on next lap.  Don;t be overcritical of them as they develop, at least to them.  You may let your mind scream all it wants, I know I do that.  As I’m smiling and telling them that their head turn was good, but need to work on bar turn, I’m screaming that “IT”S NOT ROCKET SURGERY!  YOU DROVE OVER HERE FOR CHRISSAKES!  LISTEN AND TRY IT!  WE”RE NOT GOING TO PUT YOU INTO ANYTHING THE BIKE CAN”T DO!!!!!!!” or something like that.  In the meantime, your outside voise is saying, nice head turn, try turning the bars a little more next time.  And send them on.   If you coach too much, they get overloaded.  And it slows the class down.  They are adults. 

I think you;ll be fine.   Keep them awake in class, and they usually do okay on range.

As for other coaches, yes, there are some oafish ones out there.   When you note that, be sure to try to work around them in the future.  MOST of the coaches I know are very good guys to work with.

Randy

Posted on 06/07/2007 at 08:24

 

 

Riding the Range…why?

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

I did see two coaches on the range during our lessons. One had all the students, the other had none. It became obvious where the verbage was being dispensed too liberally.

I find that some students know what they have done wrong, so simply put I say, go and put it right next time. Others need that short  re-focus.

Fortunately, despite the prattling waffle I deluge you with here, brevity is a strong point, or as I prefer to call it, strg pt.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/07/2007 at 18:31

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Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

the smell of discovery

I saw a sign today, in a shop that was so infused with perfume I gagged. Mrs L was driving (see thread on unchained world and car service)so with control having been wrenched from me, we visited Chintz Village, or whatever other collective noun this frilly gathering of household product peddling purveyors goes by. Un necessary tat, with more tat, upon tat. Doggy shaped things, herds of cat stuff, cat pillows, cat plates, cat toilet seats, I was cat aleptic. All scented like a cheap tarts boudouir who’s trying to hide the smell of her last customer (trust me, this is imagination again, the only place I’ve ever really encountered such a sickly smell is a house with a new born, all talcs, unctions and creams). So, it was with a certain surprise that I saw something worthwhile. Not worth purchasing, god forbid, it was a piece of distressed timber with a scrawled message for $25, no what was worthwhile was the message:

Discovery is seeing all the things others see, but thinking thoughts no one else has thought about them.

 That sort of sums up Unchained, it sort of sums up why I’m doing the instructing. It sort of sums up what I’d like to think I do. I just do it in a manner that smells more savoury than perfumed. More pungent sweat and grime, than lavender and lilac. The smell of fear, rather than the aroma of catnip.

 If discovery has a smell, then I reckon it’s a more acrid perfume, one that is more evocative of expended energy and effort. A tacit recollection trigger, rather than a smack in the face aromatic sensory abuse of floral concoctions in brightly coloured bottles priced to insult your common sense.

Riding has it’s sensory pleasures aural, visual and tactile, but from today onward, discovery will always smell better to me, because it won’t smell of a pomander of mixed essences of essential oils.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/10/2007 at 16:30

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Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

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sayeth the lamble

I met my mentor last night. Just my luck.

It’s the boring bugger from before. Still at least I won’t be the crappest there.

Also, for the record, Mr “I can’t see you counterweighting” was riding in the box. Foot down dabs, no lean at all. “

Let not ye be the first to cast a stone Mr “Cant it over more”, unless like I, yae, or whatever it is for me, yee droppeth ye bike in yonder box and looketh a prat. So, keepeth thine gob shut and go begat thyself. Lamble chapter 4 vs 6-9

Saturday B class. I hope the B doesn’t signify anything about the students standards, or indeed the instructors.

Should be chaos. Like Stevie Wonder  delivering post. Great!

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/12/2007 at 17:56

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Thisguy

Joined: Jan 19, 2007

 

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Re: sayeth the lamble

How about Lamble chapter 4 vs 10-12: Having taken thine own turn in the box, and having completed the drill in fine form, goeth ahead and casteth thine measured stone. Let thine measure be merciful; a gentle lob will do. But do castech thine stone.

As for all that aromatic palaver, bravo. I live near some agricultural fields where they grow strawberries. I confess I’ve not yet conceived never-before-thought thoughts while enjoying sinuses full of fruity fragrance. Ah but the smell of the harvest keeps me coming back. Going to bimble through there this Saturday, as a matter of fact. Even if the ride goes without discovery, it will be pure sensual pleasure. That’s good enough for me.

Steven

 

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Posted on 06/12/2007 at 22:12

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Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: sayeth the lamble

I hate to break from the flowery prose, but it’s too early to engage my brain for that.

 I had a new experience this last weekend.  Was working with a lady who has been coaching for 15 years.   She has had timme to see and try most everything.   We talked and decided to puthtem on the bikes Friday night.   She does that at her regular site and says it seems to work better for her.  So, I figure, I can still learn a lot.   The idea is to cover questions 41 – 69 quickly and get the studes on the bikes at about the 1 hr, 15 minute mark.   We start at 6 pm friday, so we had them at bikes for Ex 1 & 2 by 7:15.   The WORST part of this idea is that in 90 degree evening heat, one instructor has to be preppeing bikes.   And that was me.   And I sweat like, well, there is no term for how I sweat.  It shouldn’t even be called sweating.   More like a  SUPER SWEAT or HYPER SWEATING or something.   I had my shirt soaked within minutes.   Not just a light little wetness either, I’m talking “wring the water out to end the drought” soaking.

 Anyway, we get them going and that worked well.   And it made Saturday riding part a biut shorter, but we did still have to go back to cover the questions we skipped. 

That worked well.   I learned quite a bit from the lady.   By Sunday on exercise 12, she was calling two riders to my one.  I don’t spend a lot of time talking when the students stop, so I was really impressed.   I asked how she did that and she explained how she is watching one while the next is riding.   I tried and couldn’t quite coordinate my mouth, eyes, and brain to do all that.   So I stuck with my normal routine and managed to work out my timing to where I was at least calling them quicker.

Even after 6 years, I see there is still plenty to be learned.

 Other than that, the students were fairly normal.   11 of 12 passed. One student just didn’t seem to be able to progress on Sunday and did not pass.   Not sure what could have been done differently on our part.

 Now, back to “casting stones…..”

Randy

Posted on 06/13/2007 at 08:22

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Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

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Saturday

I too lived near a strawberry field, where the jam/jelly for the queen was made. On cooking day the smell was amazingly sweet and almost edible. I think if you’d hung toast on a washing line, you could have ended up with a strawberry jam sandwich.

I can see the benefit of getting the candidates riding asap, however our classroom and ranges are some distance apart in all but one location, so it would lose too much time.

Saturday, I believe I have carte blanche to do as much or as little as I like. I should do those sections that I’ve not done previously, however the ‘comfy factor’ might persuade me to stick to what I know. But that’s not very dangerous is it?

 

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/14/2007 at 00:56

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Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Saturday

Not sure what you mean by “carte Blanche” on as little or as much.   We have to get thru riding ex 9 and 10 is an option if fatigue isn’t a factor.   At this point, I usually just do 9 and call it a day.   Doesn’t seem to make much difference in the outcome or time taken.   We ride from 8 am til we’re done with a break for lunch and then finish the bookwork after the riding.    

At one site I work, like you, we are too far apart to really ride on Friday night. 

And yeah, may as well live dangerously.   Gotta push yourself a little at times.

 Randy 

Posted on 06/14/2007 at 08:06

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Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: Saturday

Rcarlisle said:

Not sure what you mean by “carte Blanche” on as little or as much.   We have to get thru riding ex 9 and 10 is an option if fatigue isn’t a factor.   At this point, I usually just do 9 and call it a day.   Doesn’t seem to make much difference in the outcome or time taken.   We ride from 8 am til we’re done with a break for lunch and then finish the bookwork after the riding.    

At one site I work, like you, we are too far apart to really ride on Friday night. 

And yeah, may as well live dangerously.   Gotta push yourself a little at times.

 Randy 

 

Carte Blanche-the lead has said I can take as much, or as little of the class, as I like, he’ll do the rest. It’s up to me to decide. I could sit at the back and just shuffle paper and listen to his excruciating droning. Alternatively, I can get up front and do some work. He’s happy with any approach.

I think I’ll try and get the adrenaline flowing by jumping in the deep end, it tends not to hurt as much in the short term as diving in the shallow end and wearing a brace for several weeks thereafter. Plus, and this applies to most things I’ve had a dabble at, you get greater rewards, even if you crash and burn, from trying something that’s got an edge to it (My Unchained and closer to the edge ride being an example, where I rode from the lowest to as high a point as I could get to, with my vertigo issues).

If it takes generating buckets of sweat to get an 11 from 12 pass rate, then bring on the sauna, let’s all get moist.

On that rather unpleasant image, I’ll leave you to ponder a response and mop up vomit.

 

———————————

Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/14/2007 at 13:55

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Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Saturday

I understand now.  Yeah, that’s how I would treat my new coaches too.  Let them do whatever parts they want, hoping they’d jump in with both sweaty feet.   When I am not up front, I usually only have half an ear listening and I am reading a magazine in the back, especially for the other coaches that are known to go on far too long. 

 May as well go ahead and try the parts you haven’t, so you can see what to adjust on them.  The students have no idea you;re trying out new stuff for you on them, and as long as it all keeps moving, no big deal.  

Enjoy the challenge.

Randy

Posted on 06/14/2007 at 14:26

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Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: Saturday

Rcarlisle said:

I understand now.  Yeah, that’s how I would treat my new coaches too.  Let them do whatever parts they want, hoping they’d jump in with both sweaty feet.   When I am not up front, I usually only have half an ear listening and I am reading a magazine in the back, especially for the other coaches that are known to go on far too long. 

 May as well go ahead and try the parts you haven’t, so you can see what to adjust on them.  The students have no idea you;re trying out new stuff for you on them, and as long as it all keeps moving, no big deal.  

Enjoy the challenge.

 

Well I’m there with the sweaty feet

Randy



———————————

Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/15/2007 at 01:11

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Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Saturday deadline

Slight trepidation at the thought that tomorrow will be my first Instructor session.

I’m even more worried about judgement from my peers than I was by our trainer. The trainer expected us to get things wrong, my peers will expect me to get things right.

 As has been pointed out previously though, the studes won’t know if I’ve loused up, so I can live with that.

I’ll work on the shock and awe principle, only in my case it will be bluff and bluster.

I’ll cram tonight, so I don’t look a complete git, but then again it may be too late for that already, having turned up for an Instructor class in a suit and by car, when they all showed up on bikes and in riding gear. Prattishness of the highest order, only defused by telling the congregated instructorhood to, “bugger off and get proper jobs”.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/15/2007 at 15:45

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Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Saturday deadline

You’ll be fine, and if not, then hey, awe them with tales of yon riding experiences.   If that doesn’t work wow them with your technical expertise.    If that doesn’t work, eh, go home and drink beer.  

 Or just follow the guidelines.   Let them teach themselves mostly in the class and just keep them on track.   Clarify if need be, for them.  Once on the range, read straight from the cards, with no deviation.   Demos?  Ride it like you would like to see them ride it, for better or worse.  

Good luck.   I hope you find that the other instructorship is glad to have you and can remember being new themselves.   At the worst, hopefully, you may have to run one over to make it better.   It’s not rocket surgery, so do the best and I hope you have as good a class as possible.

 Not everyone is cut out to ride motorcycles.

 Randy

Posted on 06/15/2007 at 16:12

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Madhatter

Joined: May 22, 2007

Location: Cheyenne, WY

 

private message

Re: Saturday deadline

As a recent graduate from a prestigious beginer MSF course, I commend you for your willingness to step out on the range with a group of newbies armed with motorbikes. My advice: try to act like its fun, winge ye not, and keep your sense of humor at the ready. I felt it was a good day on the range when no one got hurt (badly), only two people dropped their scooters, and just one went for a scenic diversion through the grassy verge. Everyone appreciated the demonstrations of versatility. From a student’s perspective, the whole course was a blast. Not everyone passed, but that was probably for the best; I’m still not sure how they let me pass, but I don’t look gift bikes in the carbuetor. Bonne chance, mon ami!

———————————

“Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”

 

Posted on 06/16/2007 at 00:27

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Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Journey’s end

Today should have been the second day of my mentoring session, where I took the lead, acted as second and observed.

On day one, I’d jumped in at the deep end, taking modules I’d not covered before and muddling my way through them. I even received praise from the students for the elements I covered in class, a couple being convinced I was, or had been a teacher, “exceptional” is a word I’ll cherish.

Today I quit. I’d taken this far enough to ensure I wasn’t a quitter. I’d taken it as far as I needed to see I’d achieved something. But, I couldn’t take it far enough away, from my concerns.

Saturday’s range time passed slowly and tortuously. The problems arose early on, because there was such disparity between the skill levels. Only one person was to cross the chasm of a ability. There was progress all round but the gap stayed and as it stayed the frustrations grew, for me in not getting response from a few riders who were holding the others back, from those who were being held back, from me for being new to this and not having the answers and from me towards the mentor who hadn’t stepped up and started to coach out the weaker riders. By lesson 8 where there’s a requirement to get up sufficient speed to reach 3rd gear, some were still so slow that those behind were shouting for them to speed up. I caught  and stopped a couple about to overtake slower riders (a major safety no-no) and held them in check, but it was all breaking down, so much so, that despite the desire to complete up to lesson 10, we called it a day.

Post class analysis was were I decided it was time to put the cones behind me and call it quits.

My frustration at not getting certain riders coached off, in the vague hope that by some miracle they’d achieve a rider level capable of passing, meant that Saturday evening was spend initially eating curry and drinking beer to calm down and relax and then planning my escape strategy.

I do not want to be bound by the all consuming need to ensure everyone gets a go at the test. Reaching the test (sorry evaluation stage, ‘test ‘being far too stressful for the students – f**k that, what about the stress of riding on the road when a 16 wheeler’s tire blows next to you and covers you in rubber, what about the stress of a snarling drooling hound pounding at you – stress and riding, it’s controlable but not avoidable, so get used to it here, it’s a bloody test!) needs to be earned. Get the best candidates you can, through to the test, where they might just stand a chance, if they haven’t been hampered throughout by those with no more chance of passing, than Superman has of getting his laundry done without comments being made.

So, this journey comes to an end. Is it a premature end? I think not. I think it ran its course. I ran a course. I passed the exams. I became an Instructor and now I’m not an Instructor anymore.

Any regrets?

Only for those students that today need to go back over lesson eight and do it again. For those students who will still be held behind not getting up to third gear speed.

 

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/17/2007 at 18:57

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Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

abdication

There was a conversation that took place where, “you can’t expect them all to like you” cropped up.

Now I wonder if the reluctance of some instructors to coach out, is a need to be liked?

If they can get everyone through to test stage, then the big, bad, nasty test is what will filter them out. The State will be the baddie, not the instructor.

Is this even part of the consideration I wonder. The abdication of responsibility for the sake of popularity?

I wonder.

Of course, all of this would be a non-issue if only training was compulsory before a rider could take to the road. But, hey, isn’t that an infringement of freedom-yep you bet ya. Would it save lives? Of course it would, but the freedom to be able to buy a bike and ride needs to be upheld, even if that means  fatalities.

Enact a law that impinges on freedom is a sure vote loser. So the folks who get elected aren’t in a rush to do anything. Shouldn’t a move for compulsory basic training come from motorcycle bodies? What and lose members?

The freedom to not be trained, buy a hugely powered bike and ride wearing little more than a bandage round your head, seems inevitably linked to riding here in the USA. I wonder what might change this? If there’s any desire for change?

 

———————————

Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/17/2007 at 18:50

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Riding the Range…why?

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

I am truly sorry to hear that you decided to quit after only a short time.   Yes it is stressful, at times, try to get that one student up to speed.   If your class time is as entertaining as this thread has been, you would be great in the class.  As for the range, you just learn to cuss under breath a lot and not take it too personally.   We had a student this weekend.   Late 50,s, had already bought a Vstar.  By Ex 4, shifting and stopping, was still not able to shift to 2nd gear or stop very well.   Tried blaming the bike.   Since they already had a bike, I let them stay.  My mistake.   Ended up holding the entire class back and I feel really bad for doing that to them.   After 6 years, it’s still hard to tell someone they should leave or they failed.   And still be nice about it, especially.  All in all, the class this weekend was not one of our best.   We started 12, ended with 10.   One lady had some arthritis and bowed out gracefully.   The other student finally quit when they saw “THE BOX”.   The other 10 passed.  Some only had marginal skills.   ONe lady talked to her hubby at lunch and asked if she could have a street bike (we had her on a dual sport) because her husband said that wasn’t a REAL bike.  GRRRRR…..

It was a very forgettable weekend.   But it is done.   they have to make their own decisions now. 

As for requirements, in NC, there is a bill before the Senate that will do away with the permit process and DMV exam.   The ONLY way to get an endorsement will be to take the MSF class.   They failed to put in any way to add resources to fund the potential increase in classes needed. 

I was looking forward to reading of your weekend experience and am sorry to hear that you have decided to quit.   Not all classes are good, but neither are they all bad.  Most are somewhere in the middle, with enough bright spots to make it worth it.  

talk to ya later.

randy

Posted on 06/18/2007 at 08:57

 

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: abdication

Lamble said:

There was a conversation that took place where, “you can’t expect them all to like you” cropped up.

Now I wonder if the reluctance of some instructors to coach out, is a need to be liked?

If they can get everyone through to test stage, then the big, bad, nasty test is what will filter them out. The State will be the baddie, not the instructor.

Is this even part of the consideration I wonder. The abdication of responsibility for the sake of popularity?

I wonder.

Of course, all of this would be a non-issue if only training was compulsory before a rider could take to the road. But, hey, isn’t that an infringement of freedom-yep you bet ya. Would it save lives? Of course it would, but the freedom to be able to buy a bike and ride needs to be upheld, even if that means  fatalities.

Enact a law that impinges on freedom is a sure vote loser. So the folks who get elected aren’t in a rush to do anything. Shouldn’t a move for compulsory basic training come from motorcycle bodies? What and lose members?

The freedom to not be trained, buy a hugely powered bike and ride wearing little more than a bandage round your head, seems inevitably linked to riding here in the USA. I wonder what might change this? If there’s any desire for change?

 

from your previous post, I would also regret my experience with Ex8 this past weekend.   The one student who held everyone up.  I really did a disservice to the others.  Ex 8 is so simple.   The cones tell you when and what gear to shift to.   But if the speed is not there….  I think I am making a personal policy to get them out before then.   Whcih leads to this post.

I gave up caring if they liked me a long time ago.   I am doing a job, and I take it very seriously.  I have had one student killed (that I know of).  A very high profile Radio personaltiy in the local market.   He took an ERC and was an awesome rider.   But was still killed by an errant driver in a freaky accident.   Since then I have made it my goal to do the class to the best of my ability, stressing that learning thses skills is very important.

Unfortunately, we cannot control what they do outside of class and even occasionally in class.

And we can’t require anything of them, as far as legalities of rider training go.  At least not yet.   As you say, we may not impinge upon the personal freedoms granted by living in the US, whether its rider training, safety gear, or even the loudness of their pipes.   Don’t even get me started on that.

 When I became an instructor, I asked our (then) state director why this wasn’;t mandatory.   He told me that we simply did not have the resources to do so.  And he is now in the Governors office that is helping push this bill through that will require it to ride legally.   Of course, an endorsement is only a letter on the license and many will continue to ride without, just as convicted drunks continue to drive and kill.   Felons still own guns.   And so on. 

 My soap box is pretty shaky, so I’ll step off now. 

If you hold with your decvision to quit, that will be a shame, because you really seem to see the importance of what we are doing.   Or at least trying to do.  Even if is does seem to be a daunting task.

Randy

Posted on 06/18/2007 at 09:14

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: abdication

Just in time. I’ve received the report that was submitted to the training company, post session. It seems I jumped just in time.

4 from 12 qualified. The four I’d said should be coached out on Saturday were coached out on Sunday, during a break in the session while the ambulance was in action picking up an injured rider. The mentor reported this as the worst class he’d had in 6 years and admitted it was no place for a rookie instructor, although in the circumstances I’d done okay.

Well, I hate to say I told you so, but, “I TOLD YOU SO”. Perhaps, if folk had had a better Saturday session they’d have had a better chance to pass. Perhaps, if the fab four that were holding everyone back had been removed, there’d have been no need for an A&E visit. Perhaps, if someone had had the balls to say enough is enough… It’s always going to be perhaps and that’s the get out clause isn’t it?

Perhaps things might change in the future, then again perhaps not.

 

———————————

Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/18/2007 at 23:39

 

Madhatter

Joined: May 22, 2007

Location: Cheyenne, WY

 

private message

Re: abdication

Lamble,

 

Perhaps you should be there to help promote change? Sounds like you know what you are doing. How does abdication help? Not that you owe it to anyone to help shape a better generation of riders–don’t think I’d spend my free time doing that right now. But I’m glad someone was there to help me, otherwise I’d still be touring on 4 wheels. Happy trails!

 

 

———————————

“Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”

 

Posted on 06/18/2007 at 23:52

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: abdication

I’m hoping that through www.unchainedworld.com I’ll be able to not only support more enjoyable riding adventures but also promote safer riding, and to a bigger audience. That way I don’t have to spend every weekend stuck in a carpark watching cones circle in on unsuspecting students, like dolphins on a tuna ball, or a pride of lions on a weak and infirmed wildebeast.

———————————

Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/19/2007 at 01:15

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: abdication

I must agree that when we finally were shed of our slow student, the class picked up.  On Sunday, we were able to complete Ex 11 thru the evaluation in 5 hours.  And we took some longer breaks due to the heat.   I realize that isn’t record-breaking by any stretch, but is quite good in an NC class.    Many days, we can only get 4 -5 exercises by lunch on Sunday.

 As you;re considering the finality of your decision, keep in mind that not every class bumbles thru.   There will be classes that flow from the minute you begin.  

many times, it only takes removing that one poor rider to change a class completely.

Randy

Posted on 06/19/2007 at 08:25

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: abdication

Rcarlisle said:

I must agree that when we finally were shed of our slow student, the class picked up.  On Sunday, we were able to complete Ex 11 thru the evaluation in 5 hours.  And we took some longer breaks due to the heat.   I realize that isn’t record-breaking by any stretch, but is quite good in an NC class.    Many days, we can only get 4 -5 exercises by lunch on Sunday.

 As you;re considering the finality of your decision, keep in mind that not every class bumbles thru.   There will be classes that flow from the minute you begin.  

many times, it only takes removing that one poor rider to change a class completely.

Randy

 

I whole heartedly agree. It was the reluctance to remove the bad riders that really annoyed me. From day one it was clear, even to a novice instructor but long time rider that there were four that could not ride and should not ride. But, but, but, they all have to be given an opportunity, they might get better tomorrow. Or, they might all slow things down again and have more accidents and one end up in hospital with internal knee damage.

I don’t know what it is that makes the decision to cut folk from class so hard. Is it the system, is it wanting to be the friend of all the riders so you get a good evaluation from them? Is cutting people seen as failure?

Whatever the reason/s riding isn’t a right. Just because you want to, doesn’t mean you should be allowed to. When freedom to do anything you want is the paramount consideration, it will always end in conflict, because your freedom isn’t everyone elses. Free to buy and ride, free to not train, free to die in a road accident. Free to build up a compelling arguement that riding is dangerous and should be banned. It is happening in Europe where training is compulsory. Legislation is trying to kill riding, because riders are killing themselves.

Who needs shaking out of their lethargy, dragging from their voter apathy, kicking up the backside with a boot of reasoning? We all do.

 

———————————

Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/19/2007 at 09:29

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: abdication

Lamble said:

I whole heartedly agree. It was the reluctance to remove the bad riders that really annoyed me. From day one it was clear, even to a novice instructor but long time rider that there were four that could not ride and should not ride. But, but, but, they all have to be given an opportunity, they might get better tomorrow. Or, they might all slow things down again and have more accidents and one end up in hospital with internal knee damage.

I don’t know what it is that makes the decision to cut folk from class so hard. Is it the system, is it wanting to be the friend of all the riders so you get a good evaluation from them? Is cutting people seen as failure?

Whatever the reason/s riding isn’t a right. Just because you want to, doesn’t mean you should be allowed to. When freedom to do anything you want is the paramount consideration, it will always end in conflict, because your freedom isn’t everyone elses. Free to buy and ride, free to not train, free to die in a road accident. Free to build up a compelling arguement that riding is dangerous and should be banned. It is happening in Europe where training is compulsory. Legislation is trying to kill riding, because riders are killing themselves.

Who needs shaking out of their lethargy, dragging from their voter apathy, kicking up the backside with a boot of reasoning? We all do.

 

 As a coach, I think it’s the “eternal optimism” that they will get better.  Plus, our trainers here have told us that, pass or fail, we want to try to expose these new riders to the proper technique.   So I have a student that already owns a bike, and I try my darndest to get them riding and learning.   So they won;t go out and try to ride with no skills.   But yes, it does become apparent that this person is not able to pick up the techniques in a manner that is consistent with all we have to do in the time we have to do it. 

 But amen to your other statements.   Riding is not a right and just because you have the money to buy a bike, doesn’t mean you have the skills to ride it without killing yourself.   People aren’t always smart.  In my situation, the student had put he cart before the horse.   Bought the bike first.  It would be much smarter to take the class and find out IF you are capable of riding a motorcycle. 

And maybe with time, some folks who can’t finish the class, will be able to learn it.   Older folks seem take a bit more time to comprehend and learn this skill set.   But we have limited time to teach it.   And NC still uses the 22 hour, 1 evening 2 day format, where many states are using the sat/sun 15 hour format.  We would have certainly been screwed in that case. 

 Coaches have to learn to be able to deal with these situations and my IP did not cover ways to handle failures and counseling in a way that makes it any easier.  One more thing you have to develop on your own.  And it is hard to tell someone they can’t do something.  I hate it and try my best to start hinting at it early.   But I am going to figure out how and what and such so that I don;t make this mistake again.

Randy

Posted on 06/19/2007 at 10:37

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: abdication

Randy, part of abdicating is passing the responsibility for continuation on to someone else’s shoulders.

Do you feel the burden?

As the Range Rider, it’s over to you.

 Do you know what I’m thinking?

I have friends in NC. I could come over and take your class, to see if you vcan get me through the BRC. I never took it as a  student, although I’ve probably covered a few more range miles than the average stoodie.

Ride on Range Rider.

 

———————————

Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/19/2007 at 14:34

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: abdication

Lamble said:

Randy, part of abdicating is passing the responsibility for continuation on to someone else’s shoulders.

Do you feel the burden?

As the Range Rider, it’s over to you.

 Do you know what I’m thinking?

I have friends in NC. I could come over and take your class, to see if you vcan get me through the BRC. I never took it as a  student, although I’ve probably covered a few more range miles than the average stoodie.

Ride on Range Rider.

 

 Gee thanks for passing it on…..  

 I don;t mind, really.    Someone has to try to teach them, even when it feels hopeless….and it pays pretty good.

 Yeah c’mon over anytime; most anyone who has ridden and tries can usually get thru.   No fair sandbagging, tho…

 Randy

 

Posted on 06/19/2007 at 15:14

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: abdication

Lamble said:

Randy, part of abdicating is passing the responsibility for continuation on to someone else’s shoulders.

Do you feel the burden?

As the Range Rider, it’s over to you.

 Do you know what I’m thinking?

I have friends in NC. I could come over and take your class, to see if you vcan get me through the BRC. I never took it as a  student, although I’ve probably covered a few more range miles than the average stoodie.

Ride on Range Rider.

[/quote]

 Gee thanks for passing it on…..  

 I don;t mind, really.    Someone has to try to teach them, even when it feels hopeless….and it pays pretty good.

 Yeah c’mon over anytime; most anyone who has ridden and tries can usually get thru.   No fair sandbagging, tho…

 Randy

 

 

 

I didn’t mean abdication of the training. I meant abdication of this thread.

The money never was an issue for me as I’m awash with dosh, well pleasantly moist any way. I really only undertook this as a way of giving back to motorcycling. Which is why I hope I can accomplish my aim via unchainedworld.com instead. I love riding. I liked the students, even the program was adequate for what it set out to achieve. But there was always a nagging doubt floating out there nibbling away at my psyche, like a flock of sabre toothed cones riding bare-backed on clouds.

Bastid cones!

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/19/2007 at 22:15

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

he’s bleedin’ snuffed it

WA Lead Instructor has emailed offering to do a class with me. Well that’s a complement, I must have shown some promise. Still the answer was thanks but no thanks. I am an ex instructor. Bereft of drive I have shuffled off the rookie range. I have ceased to teach. I am not stunned nor norweigan and blue and 20 thousand volts would not make a difference (any Python fans, I do sincerely apologise).

I’m a has been, which is still better than being a never was, however marginally.

 

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/19/2007 at 21:34

 

Madhatter

Joined: May 22, 2007

Location: Cheyenne, WY

 

private message

Re: he’s bleedin’ snuffed it

If you can quote Monty P, may I quote Father Ted?

 

Mrs Doyle: “Ah, gowan, gowan, gowan, gowan….”

 

 

 

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“Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”

 

Posted on 06/19/2007 at 22:49

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: he’s bleedin’ snuffed it

No you can’t quote Mrs Doyle, so, “arse fek’ ‘n’ drink” to you an’ all on Craggie Island. Yeejyat.

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/19/2007 at 23:09

 

Thisguy

Joined: Jan 19, 2007

 

private message

Re: he’s bleedin’ snuffed it

Sorry ol’ china, but amidst your empassioned farewell, I lost the thread. Did you quit because you determined that you’re just not a good enough instructor? Or did you quit because even though you seem destined to spark self-discovery in countless students, you just can’t bring yourself to work within the system?

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Posted on 06/20/2007 at 00:48

Riding the Range…why?

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

It’s a combination of things. Time. When I started out to become an instructor I had time as I only worked 3 days per week. This is now five or six, so I re evaluated what I needed from my relaxation time and it wasn’t 6 am starts, 6pm finishes and the concerns that come with instructing.The system is fine, but the functioning within the system seems to have a few issues. I’ll get back to this when I have more time.Moral reconciliation was another part.

Then of course there were the cones. The cones and more cones. Those beady eyed, omni-present ,vividly coloured hordes of cones. Orange and green demons, the proverbial banana skins that cause you to end unceremoniously on your backside as they chuckle at your misfortune. Misfortune and misery that they cause with such glee. The cones that dodge into your path, like suicidal lemmings, only cones don’t die, they flourish. Injury is their life force, their reason for existing is to get run over and then tell everyone you did it. Cones that taunt you by getting closer together until you can’t squeeze passed them. They crowd in and jostle, but silently like ninja cones, masters of disasters. They squeeze your space until they have you cornered and then they fly in the air in an exuberant display of victory. Victory at the expense of your shame.

There’s only one thing worse than cones….lines.

Lines are what cones will evolve into. An endlessly joined barrier of visual grief. They have even mastered the zen like quality of not having to move to display your ineptitude. They just lie there, confident that you will fail in the face of their awesome evilness, irrespective of what colour they are.

Lines make me shiver in my sleep. Be afraid.

So, in a nut shell, that’s why I decided to stop.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/20/2007 at 09:39

 

 

Thisguy

Joined: Jan 19, 2007

 

private message

Re: he’s bleedin’ snuffed it

Got it. Well, on your rare day off, enjoy the open road… where the cones are sparce and the lines are friendly.

Steven

 

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Posted on 06/20/2007 at 13:37

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

First free weekend

Well this weekend I’m off to the Tynda Rally where I’m giving a 20 min presentation on Unchainedworld and riding in the UK and Spain.

I get a 12 hr ride across country, two ranges of mountains, some forests and a replica of Stonehenge, probably the finest replica of a henge this side of the Atlantic. Maybe the only replica of a henge this side of the Atlantic. In the UK we are falling over henges. They litter the streets and spring up all over the place. You cant hobble for a mile without bumping into a henge or two.

Henges were early prototypes of cones, and were developed to compliment the extensive lay-line network. It’s true, it’s history!

See Egbert the Pedants document, Integrated Infrastructure for Cart and Horse travel speed constraints In the year of king Oddbod the Unflustered. He reports that a scheme whereby lay lines and henges would be used to contain excessive cart speed by a cunning series or bumps, obstacles, cesspits, burial mounds, swamps, lepers, volunteers and other devices was feasible, and that fines could be collected at henge -way-stations for those whose asses sped down hill.

Egbert went on to found the civil service, local government and the department of transport and deviced the ducking stool for witches.

He was brutally murdered by a goat wielding, ferret breeder and the first off-road vehicle inventor, Robin Sods of York.

Hence the saying, “It’s Sods law that you’ll get egg on your face, if you speed passed a henge, so hold on to your ass”.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/21/2007 at 01:03

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Too late

The local press have picked up on my recent qualification as an Instructor and want to do an article about my experience.

I must admit to being flattered but now feel somewhat awkward as to what I should say. Do I explain that despite the best intentions of the program, I felt it fell short of delivering what is needed to put someone on the road?

Do I state that I felt the instructor I worked with was taking the easy option out by letting the exam do the filtering?

Or do I say, I just found the time commitment too much considering my change in circumstance and hide behind that?

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/29/2007 at 15:50

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Too late

Lamble said:

The local press have picked up on my recent qualification as an Instructor and want to do an article about my experience.

I must admit to being flattered but now feel somewhat awkward as to what I should say. Do I explain that despite the best intentions of the program, I felt it fell short of delivering what is needed to put someone on the road?

Do I state that I felt the instructor I worked with was taking the easy option out by letting the exam do the filtering?

Or do I say, I just found the time commitment too much considering my change in circumstance and hide behind that?

 

 

You can say it fell short of YOUR expectations of what someone needs to ride on the roads.   but the class isn’t necessarily gerared towards making someone road-ready.   The class is geared to teach basic motorcycle skills, which it does.  It is the students’ responsibility, and they are adults, to make the decision on when or if they are ready to ride on public streets.  yes there is an old argument that the class instills false confidence, but again, these are adults that have to wear their big kid undies and make big kid decsions.  those that try to blame the class are only playing the part of Victim, which folks do so well in America when they are allowed to make a decsion for themselves and it doesn’t work out. 

Why blame the instructor you were working with?   there are (were) TWO of you.   You have to work together to complete a class.  You can only do so much in the allotted time.  If they get it and pass, good, if they don;t, they have been exposed to correct technique and hopefully learned something.

You could admit that the time and commitment are too much for you and that the cones hated you. 
I hate to say it, but your last statement is what I feel.   You;re hiding behind a lot of excuses. 

We weren’t all proficient when we began this teaching gig.    And I still try to learn something new during every class.

Maybe you could have the media do a piece on you about something else, or failing that, have them do a piece on another instructor that isn’t giving it up after one class.  

 It gets easier and I feel like you gave up too quickly.  Not as easy as the old dogs make it look.   Not as much fun either.   But for some, it is a worthwhile venture. 

Another hard decision for you there.   Good luck.  I’m off to class now.

Randy

 

  

Posted on 06/29/2007 at 16:14

 

Thisguy

Joined: Jan 19, 2007

 

private message

Re: Too late

I think I would blame the changed circumstances and the time commitment. Sure, the system isn’t perfect, and the instructors aren’t perfect, but do you want to bash them? I could be wrong, but based on your posts, I have a feeling you would’ve stayed in the program longer had your circumstances not changed.

Another option is to simply decline to be interviewed. I seriously doubt a journalist will be able to capture your colorful language and imagery, anyway.

Steven

 

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Posted on 06/29/2007 at 16:22

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: Too late

There were three of us, me leading and a second who lead when I fell short of the mark, but behind us was the real authority. The guy who could have pulled those in danger from the course. It was his decision to over ride my lead opinion that the four who carried on into the second day should carry on. I’m content that I said they shouldn’t and the outcome validated my stance.

I’m going to stick with the admiration factor for those who do this. It’s not easy and it’s not fun. I can see it being rewarding through those you do get through the course. But I also stand by my conviction that the candidates put themselves in the instructors hands and the instructor should have some responsibility in establishing who and who isn’t suitable to ride, not leave it to the assessment.

Time and the desire to see more of the USA were a major part in deciding to cease, however, I do believe that if I’d had the conviction that the course instructors were serving motorcycling as a whole with integrity and looking at what was best for the individual and the biking community with more, I’m struggling to find the right words, professionalism isn’t it, but is in part, strict adherence isn’t it either, but is in part, concern isn’t it but is in part too, in fact it’s hard to define, and therein lies the problem. There’s something missing, something intangible that I found left me unsatisfied with the approach being taken. The course gave scope, but political correctness, the need to succeed and a whole set of outside influences curtailed the ultimate fulfilment.

It may be different with different schools, I’ll never know. I can only judge by what I experienced.

My respect goes out to every instructor though, because ever little helps.

The press…I’ll see if I can get them on to Unchainedworld as a topic.

They are more likely to go for that, than my campaign to have cones exterminated.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 06/29/2007 at 16:39

     

blishing who and who isn’t suitable to ride, not leave it to the assessment.

Time and the desire to see more of the USA were a major part in deciding to cease, however, I do believe that if I’d had the conviction that the course instructors were serving motorcycling as a whole with integrity and looking at what was best for the individual and the biking community with more, I’m struggling to find the right words, professionalism isn’t it, but is in part, strict adherence isn’t it either, but is in part, concern isn’t it but is in part too, in fact it’s hard to define, and therein lies the problem. There’s something missing, something intangible that I found left me unsatisfied with the approach being taken. The course gave scope, but political correctness, the need to succeed and a whole set of outside influences curtailed the ultimate fulfilment.

It may be different with different schools, I’ll never know. I can only judge by what I experienced.

My respect goes out to every instructor though, because ever little helps.

The press…I’ll see if I can get them on to Unchainedworld as a topic.

They are more likely to go for that, than my campaign to have cones exterminated.

 

 

I’m not quite sure I’m crystal clear on how your classes were working.  But once we are out of the coach prep, we are pretty much on our own.   Most place in NC do one class per weekend with only two coaches.   Occasionally we get a visit from a trainer to check up on us.   So it is mostly up to the two of us to decide what happens and who does what and so on.  

This past weekend, we had an older gent who, no matter how excited he was to ride, could not manage to get his feet and eyes up in Ex 2.  So I spoke to him and asked him if he thought he was going to be able to do it.  Told him we could try a couple more passes, but that he needed to decide and show me he could do it.   I left it up to him and he gracefully bowed out.   Instead of us TELLING the students to stop, I have had best results letting them make that decision for themselves.  Doesn’t always work,  but seems to work better than just telling them they can’t do it and they have to leave.

It IS fun mostly and it isn’t that hard.   The materials are prescribed by the MSF, so it’s not like we are making it up.   We are just presenting  the material in our own way, while adhering to the curriculum provided.   You and I have never met, but could be scheduled together and should have roughly the same ideas and be able to present a class and get thru it.   Sounds like the ordeal of getting to work on your own is more of a hassle in WA than in NC.

I do feel it is partially my responsibility to help folks decide if motorcycling is a good idea.   And I try to on those who really don;t get it.   However, they are mostly beginners, only learning basic skills.   To that end, as a coach, I have to be cognizant that they are only trying to accomplish basic skills.   If someone is not a perfect rider, but is making progress and not endagering themselves or others, we should try to at least EXPOSE them to the proper technique for beginning riders.   If we throw them out because it would just make the class easier on us, we are doing a disservice to them.   We were all beginners at some point and need to remember how we rode.  

At the same time, we have to find a way to challenge those with experience.  

 Make it something good for everyone.   It’s tough, but after the initial “shock” wears off and a coach gains some experience and becomes comfortable with demos and material, it gets pretty good.  The trainers here are tough in the prep class, but they are much easier to work with after they get you thru.  I have found them all to be very helpful when I have questions about how something should be handled.

I know that’s a lot to read and nowhere near as entertaining as your own words (at least to me), but maybe we can each help another potential coach out. 

randy

 

Posted on 07/02/2007 at 09:05

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: Too late

See, now Randy I like the balance you give. It was specifically stated that the best way to coach out was to impart the suggestion and let the beginner come to the conclusion and that’s great. In fact I was going down that route with one candidate who appeared to be terrified, couldn’t get the bike to pull away without stalling (and this was exercise 8) so lot’s of energy and time had been expended. I don’t normally base any assessments on one case, however, the inability for the candidate to get back into the flow of traffic safely and to then move at a speed sufficiently fast to enable the rest of the group to perform the exercise to the standard required, should in my opinion as lead, have been sufficient to counsel the candidate out, there and then.

That’s not making it easier for me to instruct the group, well it is, but the emphasis should be that it makes it easier for the group to meet the standards required.

I’d have needed to be able to coach with the good of the majority as a primary goal, not the interests of the individual, who from my limited experience seem to be the poorer riders.

It may seem elitist and to a degree it is, but egalitarianism where all fail because of one doesn’t seem fair either.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 07/02/2007 at 11:52

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Too late

yes by EX 8 they should only be making occasional stalls. lol.   I try to get the weak ones thinking about their decision by lunch on Saturday.   Some of the shakier ones will finish Saturday and not return on Sunday.   But as we agree, the coaches have to look out for the group and help the individuals as much as possible.  

 I still think it’s a shame you decided to give it up.  

Randy

 

Posted on 07/03/2007 at 09:23

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: Too late

Rcarlisle said:

yes by EX 8 they should only be making occasional stalls. lol.   I try to get the weak ones thinking about their decision by lunch on Saturday.   Some of the shakier ones will finish Saturday and not return on Sunday.   But as we agree, the coaches have to look out for the group and help the individuals as much as possible.  

 I still think it’s a shame you decided to give it up.  

Randy

 

 

 

I must admit to being surprised on the Sunday morning when the candidate I’d been talking to on the Saturday and who had expressed considerable fear and demonstrated a total inability to not stall, showed up. Stalling had been well and truly mastered, in fact I’ve rarely seen better and more consistent stalling. If stalling ever needs coaching I know where to go.

If it were me, I’d not have come back. As it was, I didn’t.

Who knows what more time would have brought and part of me still thinks I should have carried on, but not the part that rolls over and snuggles up in bed on a wet Saturday at 5:30am instead of battling down a dull 405, to an even duller parking lot, to face…well who knows what?

The last two weekends I’ve ridden 1,345 miles and 734 miles and none were demos. I’ll give something back to motorcycling as it’s given so much to me and continues to do so, but not as an instructor. I’ll leave that to better souls than I.

 

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Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 07/03/2007 at 13:28

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Too late

If not for two kids and a wife, and I could look at 1345 miles in any short period, I’d be considering giving it up at least some, to be able to ride.   As is, I can’t get away with more than one at a time, so I may as well coach for the time being. 

I would really like to see some kind of numbers on how many that pass the class actually get out and ride afterwards.   Over the past 6 years, I guess I’ve been part of over 2000 people getting trained to ride.   And I have seen only a handful afterwards that are actually riding.  

I wonder if the “big fear” gets to them after class?

 Randy

Posted on 07/04/2007 at 09:33

 

Nancy

Joined: Jan 27, 2007

Location: Los Angeles, CA

 

private message

Re: Too late

Just thought I’d share a bit how my class was run and perhaps share a benefit of not having the two consecutive days on the range.  My class had 30 students, 5 instructors…..so the usual 1 per 6. I was in the group of 6 with 1 instructor,  the other groups had 12 students with 2 instuctors.

 

On Saturday we had classroom,  Sunday range.   The following Sunday, range again.  For those of us who had never riden a motorcycle,  never used a clutch, never drivin a stick, the week between was wonderful as I could use it to practice.   Luckily I had a bike available and I was able to practice not stalling everytime I wanted to move in first.  I was able to practice circles on my cul-de-sac, I was able to ride around the neighbor and just practice the basic stop and go.   This week between classes made a HUGE difference.   The first day on the range I fell because I didn’t understand the use of the clutch, the brake and stopping and slowing.  I certainly didn’t understand the exercises where they wanted us to use the clutch to move forward.   But in the week between I read, I practiced and I asked questions.   And I passed.

 

I imagine if my class was on two consecutive days I wouldn’t have returned on Sunday.  I was exhausted from Saturday and  I was sore from my fall. That week between was of great benefit.   I was motivated,  I’m sure that helped too.   

 

I also want to share that a large portion of our class rode motorcycles to the class.   In fact,  a lot of the men had been riding for years.  When asked why they were in the class they said because they’d never been able to pass the DMV skills test.   They blamed not passing the test on their “big bikes”,  not their lack of skills.   

 

Lamble,  thanks for sharing the perspective of a rider coach trainee….your experience has been most interesting.   I imagine if I was in Randy’s class I’d have been weeded out the first day on the range.   

 

I’ve been riding for 2 years now….have two bikes and over 5500 miles in the last 4 months.  I’ve been trying to catch an ERC to continue my skills.   

Posted on 07/04/2007 at 11:29

 

Lamble

Joined: Jan 10, 2007

Location: Seattle, WA

 

private message

Re: Too late

Good point Nancy,

 

Even for an experienced rider it’s an exhausting and intense period, both physically and mentally, so for a new to bikes person, I imagine it’s very gruelling.

 

From my perspective, if I hadn’t had a camel back unit, I’d have not had a drink all day and if someone hadn’t fallen off, I’d not have managed a bio break either (I was actually contemplating knocking someone off, just so I could go to the honey bucket) and no food apart from a boiled sweet I found collecting fluff in my pocket, aaah the taste of lemon and lint!

 

———————————

Lamble Banish bland www.unchainedworld.com recommendations@unchainedworld.com GS1150 ADV: Unchained Across the USA blog www.roughguidesintouch.com/lamble

 

Posted on 07/04/2007 at 16:08

 

Rcarlisle

Joined: Mar 14, 2007

Location: mount airy, NC

 

private message

Re: Too late

Nancy said:
Just thought I’d share a bit how my class was run and perhaps share a benefit of not having the two consecutive days on the range.  My class had 30 students, 5 instructors…..so the usual 1 per 6. I was in the group of 6 with 1 instructor,  the other groups had 12 students with 2 instuctors.

 

 

On Saturday we had classroom,  Sunday range.   The following Sunday, range again.  For those of us who had never riden a motorcycle,  never used a clutch, never drivin a stick, the week between was wonderful as I could use it to practice.   Luckily I had a bike available and I was able to practice not stalling everytime I wanted to move in first.  I was able to practice circles on my cul-de-sac, I was able to ride around the neighbor and just practice the basic stop and go.   This week between classes made a HUGE difference.   The first day on the range I fell because I didn’t understand the use of the clutch, the brake and stopping and slowing.  I certainly didn’t understand the exercises where they wanted us to use the clutch to move forward.   But in the week between I read, I practiced and I asked questions.   And I passed.

 

I imagine if my class was on two consecutive days I wouldn’t have returned on Sunday.  I was exhausted from Saturday and  I was sore from my fall. That week between was of great benefit.   I was motivated,  I’m sure that helped too.   

 

I also want to share that a large portion of our class rode motorcycles to the class.   In fact,  a lot of the men had been riding for years.  When asked why they were in the class they said because they’d never been able to pass the DMV skills test.   They blamed not passing the test on their “big bikes”,  not their lack of skills.   

 

Lamble,  thanks for sharing the perspective of a rider coach trainee….your experience has been most interesting.   I imagine if I was in Randy’s class I’d have been weeded out the first day on the range.   

 

I’ve been riding for 2 years now….have two bikes and over 5500 miles in the last 4 months.  I’ve been trying to catch an ERC to continue my skills.   

 

 

First, congrants, Nancy, on getting thru the class and your miles.  Glad to hear it.

But I would like to say that you would not have necessarily been weeded out.  I always ask in the class before we go to the range if folks have driven a manual trans, so that we can be aware of the clutch issues that crop up.   In NC, we do class on Friday nights, so that we have more range time on  Sat., Sun.   gives us some time to work with folks.   Never had to counsel someone out on clutch usage alone.   Most of the time, it ends up being a LOT of things piling up on a student.   Usually confidence is the biggest hurdle.   To be able to get the bike up to speed, to be able to brake firmly, to be able to manipulate the bike in the most basic ways.   I haven’t counseled anyone out because they fell, or dropped a bike.   I will defend the few times I have had to counsel folks out and my reasoning for such.  

As for the separated weekends, there are pros and cons and I can see both sides.   A lot of folks do not have the luxury of a bike to practice on between classes.  You are fortunate, in your circumstance, that everything did work out.  

Lamble: it sounds like your program is much harder on everyone than the one we use.   It is very important that the coaches get a break too.  I would rather run long, than to overheat and overwork the coaches.  And would not tolerate not having or giving the coaches a break too.  Again the 22 hr format we still use from the old RSS is helpful here.  WE break every two exercises and stop for 10 -20 minutes.   Gives everyone time to rest. 
I do appreciate the discussion we have been having on this.   I get new instructors and am not that far removed from it myself.  Unlike many coaches, I had basically no street exp before I started in ’98.   I took the old RSS and the ERC, and then began researching becoming a coach.  I can still remember the nervousness and fear and such that go with each of the classes.   I am also a pretty “new” rider myself, compared to most.  I did overcome the cone thing, by steadily mashing them into submission.   Eventually they do quit bothering you and lead a mostly quiet existence.

Randy

Posted on 07/05/2007 at 08:28

     

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